The Seven

The religion that follows the Seven is so dominant in Westeros that it is referred to simply as “the Faith.” It was brought over by the Andal invaders, some of whom wore the seven-pointed star of their gods painted or carved into their flesh.

The Seven are the Crone, the Smith, the Mother, the Father, the Maiden, the Warrior, and the Stranger. The Crone, Mother, and Maiden are female, the Smith, Father, and Warrior male, and the Stranger both and neither. Each has a broadly defined area of concern, so the Crone watches over wisdom and discernment, the Smith over creation—particularly through crafts of all sorts, the Mother over parental love, the Father over rulership and justice, the Maiden over innocence, joy, and youth, and the Warrior over valor and combat. The Stranger is concerned with death. While most people, nobles and smallfolk alike, treat them as seven gods, the doctrine of the Faith is they are seven aspects of a single god.

Worship takes place in a seven-walled building called a sept. Each
god is represented inside, and candles burn in front of the images, lit by those who have prayed. The Stranger rarely has more than a handful of candles, while in times of war, the Mother and Warrior stand behind rank upon rank of lights. The decoration of the sept depends on the wealth of those who support it. A simple village sept might have crude charcoal drawings of the gods on the walls, while the Grand Sept of Baelor in King’s Landing has stained-glass windows, mosaics, fine statues, and gilded surfaces. Private worship consists mainly in saying prayers and lighting candles before the images. Public worship includes devotional hymns and an address. The Seven also feature in many popular songs, which treat them with varying levels of respect.

 

The Seven

Loyalty Binds Us Jaxvor